Emerging tourism in Ireland

Emerging tourism in Ireland

Soaring Australasian and American visitor numbers have helped Ireland offset the negative effects Brexit may have had on British tourism figures.  
Australasian visitor numbers to Ireland are up 16% for January to March 2017, while there was a 23% growth spurt from the American market during the same period. These numbers have helped boost Tourism Ireland’s overall number of tourists by 1%.
However, the destination noted a 6.5% fall in British visitor numbers.

Niall Gibbons, CEO of Tourism Ireland says the drop in British visitor numbers reflects the economic situation.
‘The drop in the value of sterling has made holidays and short breaks here more expensive for British visitors; and economic uncertainty is making them more cautious about their discretionary spending. This is impacting on travel to Ireland,’ Gibbons says.
‘Tourism Ireland will continue to monitor developments around Brexit closely to better understand and plan for its implications. Competitiveness and value for money will be a more important message than ever throughout 2017.’
Gibbons says the Australian and Kiwi markets are gaining traction for the country: ‘We’re seeing the benefit of our sales missions to Australia/New Zealand, China, India and the Middle East in 2016.’
The growth in the American market is particularly pleasing for the tourism body, he adds.
‘Tourism Ireland has prioritised North America for 2017 as a market that offers a strong return on investment. A number of factors are working in our favour.'
The organisation is aiming to raise overseas tourism revenue this year by 4.5% to €5.7 billion.
It will be promoting sights such as the Wild Atlantic Way, Ireland’s Ancient East, Titanic Belfast and the Causeway Coastal Route as well as Dublin and Belfast. And it will continue to capitalise on its connections to Star Wars and Game of Thrones.

ProMag